- Hide menu

Ridin’ a Killer Elephant ~ Thailand

A mahout riding an elephant in the river and spraying the tourists with water in Thailand.

~~oOo~~

No I’m just kidding, it’s not really a Killer Elephant..

This mahout was riding the pachyderm in a river in Mae Tang and ordering it to splash the happy tourists tightly gathered on the bank.

Needless to say, the cool spray of water was followed by people hysterically running around shrieking like teenagers in a bad horror movie as if the elephant just spit some corrosive acid on them.

It was hilarious to watch.

~~oOo~~

Quick Tips:

When shooting handheld (no tripod), do not go over 1/30s in shutter speed. It is considered the limit to get a sharp image. Slower than that, the image would have a little blur due to hand shake. Of course you can go slightly slower if you lens has an optical stabilization.

~~oOo~~

3 Things I love:

Chilling in a hammock with a cool breeze

Old music boxes

A hot chocolate on a cold night

~~oOo~~

Are you interested in improving your photography? Would you like to have an honest opinion about your work? I have launched a new feature on Canvas of Light: FREE PHOTO CRITIQUES! Just go to this Photo Critique Page, follow the procedure and I’ll gladly share my knowledge with you and help you improve as much as I can. Enjoy!

~~oOo~~

If you enjoyed this post, please consider following me on Facebook, Twitter or Google+. You can also subscribe to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader. Thank you
  • Pingback: Tweets that mention Ridin' a Killer Elephant ~ Thailand | Canvas of Light ~ Photography -- Topsy.com

  • Brady

    1/30 of a second? It depends on the lens. The general rule of thumb is 1/focal length. So if you’re shooting with a 200mm lens your shutter speed would be around 1/200 sec to avoid blur due to shake.

    • http://www.canvas-of-light.com Daniel Nahabedian

      Yes you are absolutely right. The correct tip is actually: Never shoot slower than 1/focal length (if shooting 30mm it’s 1/30s, if shooting 100mm it’s 1/100s). Thanks!

  Subscribe To My Newsletter
SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER

Dear visitor,

If you like what you see, please feel free to subscribe to my newsletter and get tutorials, videos, new information about workshops and free goodies directly to your email. Thanks!

* I hate spam as much as you do and will never share or sell your details.
×