Patuxai Monument ~ Laos

Patuxai Monument ~ Laos

The victory monument called Patuxai in Vientiane Laos.

A few weeks ago, we went to Vientiane in Laos for a visa run and a 6-months tourist visa for Thailand. We stayed in town for 3 days and did not get to visit much. The only monument we got to visit in this dull capital was the Patuxai, also known as the Victory Gate.

Patuxai comes from the words Patu meaning “Gate” and Xai meaning “Victory”. It was designed by the architect Mr. Tham Sayasthsena, a Laotian citizen. The gate was built between 1957 and 1968 as a monument dedicated to those fallen during the fight for independence from France. The construction was funded by the USA. The money was originally given to be used to build an airport for the capital but the government decided it was much more clever to build a monument with that money. As a consequence, the monument is sometimes referred to as the “vertical runway“.

Ironically, the monument looks like the French ‘Arc de Triomphe’ from a distance. However, when closer, it looks more like an unfinished ‘monster of concrete’ (as written on a sign on one of the towers) with Buddhist ornaments and Naga statues.

It is possible to climb all the way to the top for a small fee. The inside of the monument is a giant souvenir shop and the rooftop is actually in a poor condition with broken signboards and electric wires on the floor. The panoramic view of Vientiane however is really nice.

Overall, I was really not impressed by the Patuxai. No one knows if it will ever be completed despite the government repeatedly authorizing new funds.

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  • http://scribblerstravels.com/ Russell Burck

    I like the photo, and I really like the story you tell with it. Russ

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    Nice shot! I’ve been there 3 years ago. Seen from a distance, it is a very impressive monument. Also,the gardens in the park are beautifully planted and manicured where one can relax and have an ice-cream while watching people come and go.

  • http://www.indovillas.com Kimberly

    Wonderfully captured! It looks like an entrance to a lost civilization/paradise, lovely! I would love to spend my summers here:)

    • http://www.canvas-of-light.com Daniel Nahabedian

      Thank you :)

  • http://www.goseewrite.com/ Michael Hodson

    I was really unhappy with my shots of this one. As usual…. you kicked my ass. ;)

  • http://blog.kenkaminesky.com/ Ken Kaminesky

    Killer shot Daniel! I’m really hoping to do a nice long tour of South East Asia in the next year or two. It’s images like this that inspire me. Bravo man, well done :)

    • http://www.canvas-of-light.com Daniel Nahabedian

      Merci Ken. You should! Asia is really fantastic and probably a good playground for your photos :)

  • http://thaiconnoisseur.blogspot.com Peter_M

    It is a shabby, concrete monstrosity up close……and yet, there is something inelegantly beautiful about it. Maybe it is the human activity it attracts in the attractive gardens that surrounds it, or maybe it resembles a dilapidated, but once beautiful, colonial artifact that has seen better days. The view from the top presents a nice overview of the city. The hammer and sickle flag hanging off the side reminded me that I was in a communist country (not too many left). Like it or dislike it, it is a prominent symbol of Vientiane and the photo above captures it perfectly.

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